December 12, 2017 eNews

December Meeting Agenda

Tuesday, December 19
6:30pm • Armatage Community Center

  • Welcome
  • City Council Update
  • Park Update, Nikki Friederich
  • President’s Report
  • Secretary Report – November minutes approved online
  • Treasurer Report
  • Committee Updates
    • Community Engagement
      • Washburn Park (Dec 2)
      • Happy Hour (Jan 9)
    • Green Team
      • Rain gardens: final consultations by mid-Dec; property plans by early Jan; install date decided Feb
  • Coordinator Update
    • Tree lighting recap
  • Coordinator Contract
  • New Business
    • Neighborhood Forests
  • Adjourn

Upcoming meetings/events

  • Armatage Happy Hour 1/9
  • Next regular ANA meeting 1/16
  • Fire on Ice 1/19
  • Minneapolis Connections Conference
  • Saturday, February 10th
  • Minneapolis Convention Center

Snow Removal

Minneapolis ordinance requires property owners of houses and duplexes to clear sidewalks within 24 hours after a snowfall, and all other property owners must clear their sidewalks within four daytime hours.

The City has stepped up enforcement activities to ensure compliance with the sidewalk snow and ice ordinance, and it increased the number of staff involved with winter sidewalk inspections. Call 311 to report unshoveled sidewalks and learn more about resources available to people who may need help clearing their sidewalks.


Do you enjoy working with older adults and want some part time work?

We are hiring snow removal workers in Hennepin County!

Shovel within 24 hours of end of 2+ inch snowfalls. Commit for the entire season, until the final snow/ice storm of spring. Provide your own equipment & transportation. Paid $16 per hour; hours depend upon snowfall. Can work with multiple senior citizen clients. Age 16+. For details contact Bethany Sapp at or call 952-767-7886. Located in Minneapolis and suburban Hennepin County.

A low-salt diet for our lakes and streams

A little salt can go a long way for managing snow and ice. But too much salt – which may be less than you think – is causing irreversible damage to our lakes and streams.

The danger of ice and snow on roads and sidewalks is a fact of life in Minnesota, and salt and sand can help reduce ice and add traction. When that snow inevitably melts, however, most of that salt and sand wash directly into nearby waters. 

Currently, salt use is not regulated, but it poses a real threat to clean water. The chloride contained in one teaspoon of road salt can permanently pollute five gallons of water. Chloride upsets aquatic environments, can kill birds and some plants, and can impact groundwater used for drinking.

Many people use more salt than they need.  But using more salt does not melt more ice, or melt it faster. In reality, salt only works when the temperature is above 15 degrees. Extra salt crystals will just eventually become a pollutant. It’s best to use no more than one pound of salt per 250 square feet (for scale, a typical parking space is about 150 square feet). One pound of salt fills up a 12-ounce coffee mug.

Want to protect your local lake or stream from chloride pollution? Here are some easy ways you can help:

  • Shovel regularly (a great form of winter exercise) to minimize ice buildup.
  • Break up ice with an ice scraper before deciding if sand or salt is necessary for traction – you may find that it’s not.
  • Salt won’t work if the temperature is below 15 degrees. Use calcium chloride or magnesium chloride instead, or use a small amount of sand for traction.
  • Sweep up any salt that’s visible on dry pavement and use it elsewhere or throw it away. 

By being proactive with your snow management, and using salt and sand wisely, you can save money, time, and the environment without sacrificing safety. Learn more at

Yes, there is still time to register for Winter Youth Sports Leauges